Myotherapy

Myotherapy

Have you ever experienced aches or pains yet haven’t wanted to travel the traditional route of using a physiotherapist or a chiropractor to fix the pain? Why not consider myotherapy as a way of healing injuries or reducing pain? Elisha Furmanczyk is an accomplished practitioner.
“Myotherapy focuses on treating soft tissue injury and dysfunction, which may be in the form of chronic pain, reduced range of movement or an acute injury, such as an ankle sprain. In a literal sense, myotherapy means muscle therapy.”
So what actually causes pain within the body? Posture is actually one of the most common causes of pain. Poor posture creates enormous strain on joints or muscles that shouldn’t be taking that load. Repeated movements like swimming, throwing or typing, with poor technique, will often lead to injury and pain.
People who work in corporate or office environments – or who simply have to use a computer for whatever reason – often have chronic issues thanks to bad posture and poor workstation set-up. We’ve all had the experience of feeling stiff and sore, with painful wrists, after sitting at the computer for too long.
Myotherapy uses a range of different treatments in order to relieve pain. A myotherapist may use massage, dry needling, cryotherapy, electrotherapy, taping, corrective exercises and corrective stretching. A myotherapist will work within the joint’s normal range of motion and the aim of a session is to reduce pain, restore range of movement and restore normal strength.
In a typical session, a myotherapist will ask questions to ascertain where the problem is and the possible cause. The therapist will then perform a dynamic examination where they will assess the range of movement, specific strength, the degree of pain, posture, etc. They will then have a pretty good idea of what’s going on and how they are going to treat it.
Myotherapy is not an intensive or invasive treatment at all. A good practitioner will assess the problem and then determine the intensity of the treatment plan. You, as the patient, should be informed at all stages of the treatment process and be able to give your myotherapist feedback about the treatment. You should be comfortable with all aspects of your treatment.
How long is a typical course of treatment? That can be hard to predict and it depends a lot on the issue being treated. An acute injury, such as an ankle sprain, may need only one session, while chronic issues may need ongoing treatment. As a ballpark figure, an average course of treatment would be four 45 minute sessions over four weeks, with the initial session lasting for around an hour.
Because developing flexibility and strength is a key component of myotherapy, the practitioner will also stretch your affected muscles and teach you some corrective exercises to do at home.
So whether you suffer from headaches, backaches, sports injuries, or even just an ache that won’t go away, give myotherapy a shot. You might just come away feeling better than you have in years!

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