Indian Head Massage

Indian Head Massage

Yu is currently studying for her exams at university and the stress of it all is getting a bit much. But she has a secret weapon up her sleeve; she knows just where to go to get a big dose of relaxation and mental focus. Indian head masseuse Michelle Wolff is one of the best in the business. Having studied with a blind Indian osteopath, among others, her style is very comprehensive. There is more to Indian head massage than just physical touch.
Michelle starts off with light massage to make sure Yu’s muscles are warm. She says most people hold some tension in the neck, shoulder and head regions. Indian head massage cannot only effectively relieve this tension, it can also relieve eye pain and improve sight, relieve jaw pain, and encourage hair to grow back. There are even certain herbal blends you can put on your head to stop your hair turning grey.
Michelle performs gentle sweeping motions on Yu’s neck. This is to encourage lymph flow in the right direction and to release negative, built-up energies.
Michelle holds her hands over Yu’s forehead, eyes and cheekbones at a certain point in the massage. This is to induce stillness, calm and trust in the recipient. Humans find holding a very comforting form of touch.
Michelle begins to massage Yu’s ears, explaining that acupoints on the ears relate to the rest of the body.
“The ear represents the whole body and it’s like an upside-down embryo – so you’ve got the head and the neck down the bottom here, and then the back along here, and the feet, with all of the organs in between. So when you are massaging the ear you are helping to stimulate the whole body. But people will notice, particularly if you try massaging your own ear, there are particular points that really hurt and they’re to do with imbalances in the body. So if you work on those for longer you’ll be helping that particular part of the body.”
Indian head massage can be administered with or without oils. Yu opts for a Brahmi blend. This herb is renowned for its potential to sharpen the memory – just what Yu needs to ace those exams. Michelle carefully coils Yu’s hair around her fingers and pours the oils into the cone of hair.
Things get a bit more brisk with vigorous head rubbing. Imagine all that fresh blood nourishing Yu’s hair follicles and brain. Hair pulling further stimulates the circulation. Michelle says Indian head massage is great for people who have lost their hair due to chemotherapy. It really encourages regrowth.
After all the invigorating rubs, Michelle uses polarity therapy to make sure Yu is calm, centred and balanced again before she stands up. She places one hand on Yu’s forehead and one under her chin, then swaps them around. This is a form of energy healing. All the way through this massage, Michelle has paid due respect to the chakras. Sometimes they become blocked. Indian head massage is a great way to rebalance them.
“It works a bit like a piece of music so each movement follows the other in a certain rhythm and a pattern.”
The blend of slow, subtle rhythms mixed with the vigorous rubbing, and interspersed with moments of stillness, are a healing language to the soul.

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