Goddess Session

Goddess Session

Listen to the words of the Great Mother, who of old was called Artemis, Astarte, Dione, Diana and by many other names.
For thousands of years, the concept of the goddess was revered and celebrated by cultures all over the planet. From the ample motherly figurines of the Venuses of Willendorf and Laussel, to the svelte, regal poise of Egypt’s Isis.
The goddess was a favourite of the people. To them she was Mother Earth, bestower of abundance, life and joy. She was by turns gentle and powerful. Linked to the phases of the moon and the turning of the seasons, she represented all that was feminine.
Some archaeologists and anthropologists believe that early societies, such as those in China, were matriarchal, meaning descendants were traced through the female blood line. It is thought males and females enjoyed equal status in these early times.
But soon the tides turned and with the coming of the solar calendar came a preference for the male god. The goddess was shunned and allocated to a subservient position.
Then came the burning times, and for hundreds of years the beautiful rituals of the feminine archetype were driven underground and forgotten. Until now.
In the early 1900s, with the uncovering of Egypt’s treasures, the goddess showed her face again. People were inspired and began to rediscover her ways.
By the 1950s, goddess worship was legalised again in the west. The modern goddess tradition was born.
One of the most popular acts of modern goddess traditions is to gather as friends and celebrate the uniqueness and sacred spirit of each woman. The benefits of stopping to reflect, honouring our current situation, and spending quality time with other women and ourselves, allow better health and awareness of our needs.
Gatherings can include sharing within the group on what is happening for each individual, allowing pent-up emotions and energy to be released and the woman to be unburdened. To help relax there are often pampering rituals, including foot massages, which can bond and ground the group.
Understanding and connecting within ourselves can be accessed through meditation or guided visualisations by a facilitator or high priestess experienced in goddess practices, allowing women to go within and know themselves, or receive messages from the goddess about their lives.
Letting go of situations, people or objects that are obstructing happiness, transformation or knowledge is a common practice. Here, letting go is being achieved through the woman writing the aspect of her life that she wants to let go of, and voicing it while burning the paper and allowing the obstructions to literally go up in flames.
Once letting go has occurred, guidance is sought. Here the women are pulling goddess cards featuring different archetypes of goddesses from different cultures and times in history.
Food can be an important part of a gathering and the feast is blessed before people eat. The high priestess will often request certain types of food depending on the aims of the gathering.
What do women get from the goddess traditions? Participants find that their personal wellbeing improves and a sense of empowerment emerges. They gain an understanding of themselves and other people. They may emerge from a gathering ready to face the world of household and business affairs by having retreated to a special place.
Overall, the goddess offers tools for regeneration and encouragement to balance our lives. And let’s not forget – it’s heaps of fun being a goddess.

Link

STAR OF ISHTAR
www.starofishtar.com
offers courses, seminars & private consultations unveiling the 7 feminine & masculine psychological archeytpes (known as Gods & Goddesses) which act as keys to understanding & healing the 7 major chakras within the body.
Star of Ishtar also offers a wide range of sacred celebrations such as ‘Red Tent’ Bridal Showers which reawaken the ancient customs once shared in the traditional Henna Night.