Counselling

Counselling

"I just need to talk about it."
A friend, a fairy godmother or just someone who understands. How many times do we wish there was someone with whom we could discuss the trials of life and difficulties faced; someone to mull over options and solutions. Our mum might be dying, our boss yelled at us, we missed an opportunity, or we are feeling depressed.
For everything, from facing horrific traumas to trivial situations, there are skilled people who will help us. They are called counsellors.
“It feels so much better talking about it.” This is something counsellors often hear. The need to talk about ourselves, our families, relationships, work issues, and fears often needs a skilled counsellor to create a safe, non-judgemental space.
Counselling is a way of addressing and resolving issues. It may involve identifying options, learning new skills to cope better, gaining greater understanding of issues, or being supported while recovering from some significant life event.
The counsellor acts as a facilitator in helping clients to understand feelings, behaviours, relationships with others, situations, choices and decisions. There are many different types of counselling, including narrative therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, hypnotherapy, family therapy, marriage counselling and sex therapy.
Counselling can be either face to face with a counsellor in a private room or can be group therapy where participants have the benefits of the group dynamics in a confidential and safe environment. There is also telephone counselling, which is useful if the counsellor you want to speak to is in another location or if you are house-bound.
The main features of a counselling session are a safe, private environment, respect and acknowledgement of your feelings and circumstances, and a pre-set time period, usually an hour in length.
Counsellors are usually trained in an institute, university or college and have various specialist and general skills, including listening, guiding, acknowledging emotions, and assisting with insights into behaviours, patterns and ways of thinking.
Counsellors may work in private practice for a fee, or in a public institution. If funding is available from elsewhere, they may offer free or subsidised services.
After attending counselling, people find that they get a better insight into how they behave and the patterns that have them stuck in a situation they don’t like. They feel better about themselves and understand issues. Often people can move on and let go of other people, jobs, study or a life path that doesn’t help them.
Many people drag their feet when they enter a counselling session and lift their feet when they leave, ready to face the rest of their lives with confidence and hope. It’s wonderful what just talking about something and being listened to can do.
Who needs to hide their problems when you can talk about them?